Junior Therapist

Salary Expectations:

£50,000 – £75,000 p.a. based on full time contract.  This includes a substantial bonus based on personal and business performance.

Outline of Work Responsibilities

Cardinal Clinic receives around 20 new referrals each week across our adult and CAMHS services. We average around 15 in-patients per night. This caseload generates around 20,000 outpatient consultations each year.

Where psychological therapy is appropriate, the client is allocated a dedicated clinical psychologist or therapist.  Generally, that clinician will remain with that patient for the duration of their care with Cardinal Clinic.

We expect all our psychologists to see patients in both in-patient and out-patient settings.  We also expect our less experienced therapists to lead in-patient and day care group therapy sessions.

Clinician Support

Each therapist will have the support of an administrator who will liaise with patients and undertake such administrative tasks as are appropriate to ensure the highest possible standards of patient care.

Patient Contact Expectations

Consultations with our clients may occur during the normal working day or during the evenings.  Some flexibility on hours is therefore essential.  We would expect every therapist to undertake some evening clinics.

We set expectations for patient contact on a programmed activity (PA) basis.  This equates to a single four hour period.

Examples of what we would expect to be a routine amount of patient contact per programmed activity could be as follows:

  • Three group sessions
  • Three in-patient consultations
  • 3.5 Out-patient consultations

Performance Management

We expect our therapists to provide care of an extremely high quality. We undertake regular performance reviews to ensure our standards are being maintained. These performance reviews are based on 360-degree feedback from colleagues, from patient reviews received on our I Want Great Care platform, on compliance with our procedures and on outcome measurements of patient’s progress.

Clinical Responsibilities

  • Provide specialist psychological assessments of individuals under the care of Cardinal Clinic.
  • To formulate and implement plans for psychological therapy.
  • To be responsible for implementing a range of specialist psychological interventions for individuals, carers, families and groups.
  • To be involved with and help coordinate the implementation of positive behaviour support plans across the service.
  • To provide specialist psychological advice, guidance and consultation to other professionals contributing directly to individual’s formulation and intervention plan.
  • To undertake clinical risk assessments and risk management plans for individuals and to provide advice to other professionals on psychological aspects of risk assessment and risk management.
  • To read, understand and comply with Cardinal Clinic’s policies and procedures.
  • To work effectively with internal and external colleagues to ensure an effective multi-disciplinary team approach supports providing excellence in mental health care.

Other Responsibilities and Expectations:

  • To actively participate in and contribute to the development and maintenance of internal and external Continuing Professional Development programmes.
  • To maintain the highest standard of clinical record keeping in accordance with professional codes of practice and company policies and procedures.
  • To receive regular clinical professional supervision in accordance with good professional practice guidelines.
  • To be involved in the training and supervision of colleagues.
  • To contribute to the development, evaluation and monitoring of the company’s operational policies and services.
  • To provide input to service and professional management on opportunities for improvement in quality, clinical governance or commercial performance of Cardinal Clinic.
  • To attend regular service meetings and Psychological Advisory Committee meetings.
  • To be involved in initiatives to improve models of mental healthcare with input into plans, collection of clinical data from existing patients and reviewing outcomes for efficacy.

Full Job Description

For the full job description of this role, please click here:  Clinical Psychologist Job Role

Middle Grade / RMO / Associated Specialist Psychiatrist

Salary Expectations:

Competitive based on experience.

Outline of Work Responsibilities 

Cardinal Clinic averages around 15 – 20 in-patients in our facility at any time.  These will be under the care of both employed and visiting consultant psychiatrists.  These consultants work a variety of shift patterns around other private and NHS commitments.

This role will be responsible for providing consistency of care during core hours, to facilitate admissions and discharges and provide support to our nursing team through daily ward rounds.

Performance Management 

We expect all our clinical staff to provide care of an extremely high quality. We undertake regular performance reviews to ensure our standards are being maintained. These performance reviews are based on 360-degree feedback from our nursing team, from patient reviews received on our I Want Great Care platform, on compliance with our procedures and on outcome measurements of patient’s progress. 

Other Responsibilities and Expectations

  • To maintain their own continuing professional development (CPD) obligations as outlined by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and to support colleagues with mentoring and training, as required.
  • To contribute to improving standards of clinical care through participation in clinical audit and quality improvement activities.
  • To participate in annual appraisal and job planning processes.
  • To participate in continuing medical education events and undertake statutory and mandatory training programmes.
  • To participate in initiatives to improve models of mental healthcare with input into plans, collection of clinical data from existing patients and reviewing outcomes for efficacy.
  • To be approved as a Responsible Clinician or be willing to undertake training to obtain Section 12(2) MHA and to renew this approval according to agreed procedures.

Full Job Description

For the full job description of this role, please click here: Consultant Psychiatrist Job Description 

Deputy Matron

Overview:

The Deputy Matron/Team leader will have responsibility for the professional leadership of the nursing workforce during day shifts.  The post holder will ensure that the care provided by Nurses is delivered with compassion, embodies quality and fulfils the clinic purpose of delivering safe, effective and personal care to every patient, every time.

The post holder has specific responsibility for patient safety, patient experience and quality assurance and works closely with the Medical Director, Hospital Director and Matron to demonstrate highly visible leadership, working as part of a cohesive, multi professional senior team contributing to the overall strategic direction and leadership of the Clinic.

Accountability:

  • To keep up to date with current mental health legislation & ensure clinical standards reflect current legislation.
  • Keep up to date with own mandatory and statutory training, personal development and appraisal.

Main Responsibilities:

Safe & Effective Patient Care

  • To lead a team that focuses on the patient journey by co-ordinating and directing effective nursing care, ensuring each patient receives the same excellence of care.
  • Interact with inpatients to ensure their needs are being met.
  • Ensuring adequate staffing levels for safe & effective nursing and provision of groups.
  • Responding to concerns and investigating when required.
  • To have a working knowledge of and participate in patient’s programme.

Quality Assurance

  • Assisting in the investigation of complaints & incidents
  • Contributing to Clinical Governance
  • Oversight of clinical policies
  • Ensuring CQC clinical standards are met
  • Lead on health and safety in the Clinical area
  • Audit support
  • Ensure the nursing team is compliant with Cardinal Clinic policies and procedures.
  • Ensuring that requests and instructions from internal and external colleagues are dealt with professionally and promptly.
  • Provide supervision for junior members of the team

Leadership of Nursing Team

  • Recruitment of suitably skilled & qualified staff
  • Have systems in place to ensure skilled staffing levels through staff rotas & training
  • Undertaking appraisals of nursing team members
  • Working with Training Co-ordinator to ensure staff are adequately trained
  • Deliver training and developmental activities to the nursing team
  • Performance management of nursing staff, developing their potential and addressing     poor performance including sickness absence

Corporate Responsibilities

  • Chair the Nurses Advisory Committee and Weekly Nurses Meetings
  • Work with Medical Director, Matron & Hospital Director to ensure safe and effective functioning of Clinic
  • Contribute to continuing development of the Clinic to meet strategic aims
  • Work with colleagues to promote the Clinic within the wider community, building sustainable relationships with key partners
  • Contribute to effective management of finances
  • Attend clinical and managerial meetings as required.

The above list is not exhaustive and can change on a daily basis to meet the needs of the Clinic.

You should also be:

  • Aware and comply with the company policies and procedures and in particular those that are relevant to your department
  • Aware and comply with the Health & Safety policies of the Clinic

Key skills & behaviours

  • Registered Mental Health Nurse (minimum)
  • Minimum of 5 years post qualification experience
  • Documented evidence of CPD
  • Evidence of teaching and assessing in Clinical Practice.  Mentorship trained.
  • Ability to use initiative and be proactive
  • Good verbal & written communication skills and record keeping
  • Ability to work as part of a team
  • Good leadership skills
  • Previous management/leadership experience desirable
  • Active interest in education and training with a commitment to lifelong learning
  • Ability to work with complexity
  • Good computer skills would be an advantage
  • Flexibility and a willingness to have a ‘hands on’ approach to work
  • Sound organisational skills and the ability to plan, prioritise and adapt to changing demands

Next Steps

If you would like any further information or to register for our recruitment open day on 10th November, please complete the form below and we’ll be in touch.

    Clinical Psychologist

    Salary Expectations:

    £60,000 – £125,000 p.a. based on full time contract.  This includes a substantial bonus based on personal and business performance.

    Outline of Work Responsibilities

    Cardinal Clinic receives around 20 new referrals each week across our adult and CAMHS services. We average around 15 in-patients per night. This caseload generates around 20,000 outpatient consultations each year.

    Where psychological therapy is appropriate, the client is allocated a dedicated clinical psychologist or therapist.  Generally, that clinician will remain with that patient for the duration of their care with Cardinal Clinic.

    We expect all our psychologists to see patients in both in-patient and out-patient settings.  There may also be opportunities to lead group therapy on our in-patient or day care programmes.

    Clinician Support

    Each clinical psychologist will have the support of a dedicated administrator who will liaise with patients and undertake such administrative tasks as are appropriate to ensure the highest possible standards of patient care.

    Patient Contact Expectations

    Consultations with our clients may occur during the normal working day or during the evenings.  Some flexibility on hours is therefore essential.  We would expect every clinical psychologist to undertake some evening clinics.

    We expect our clinical psychologists to achieve an average of 75% direct patient contact during clinics.  This equates to 3.5 consultations per four hour clinic (programmed activity).

    In addition, programmed activities will be allocated for non-client facing activities and an allowance for personal development days is also made each year as part of the job planning exercise.

    Performance Management

    We expect our clinical psychologists to provide care of an extremely high quality. We undertake regular performance reviews to ensure our standards are being maintained. These performance reviews are based on 360-degree feedback from colleagues, from patient reviews received on our I Want Great Care platform, on compliance with our procedures and on outcome measurements of patient’s progress.

    Clinical Responsibilities

    • Provide specialist psychological assessments of individuals under the care of Cardinal Clinic.
    • To formulate and implement plans for psychological therapy.
    • To be responsible for implementing a range of specialist psychological interventions for individuals, carers, families and groups.
    • To be involved with and help coordinate the implementation of positive behaviour support plans across the service.
    • To provide specialist psychological advice, guidance and consultation to other professionals contributing directly to individual’s formulation and intervention plan.
    • To undertake clinical risk assessments and risk management plans for individuals and to provide advice to other professionals on psychological aspects of risk assessment and risk management.
    • To read, understand and comply with Cardinal Clinic’s policies and procedures.
    • To work effectively with internal and external colleagues to ensure an effective multi-disciplinary team approach supports providing excellence in mental health care.

    Other Responsibilities and Expectations:

    • To actively participate in and contribute to the development and maintenance of internal and external Continuing Professional Development programmes.
    • To maintain the highest standard of clinical record keeping in accordance with professional codes of practice and company policies and procedures.
    • To receive regular clinical professional supervision in accordance with good professional practice guidelines.
    • To be involved in the training and supervision of colleagues.
    • To contribute to the development, evaluation and monitoring of the company’s operational policies and services.
    • To provide input to service and professional management on opportunities for improvement in quality, clinical governance or commercial performance of Cardinal Clinic.
    • To attend regular service meetings and Psychological Advisory Committee meetings.
    • To be involved in initiatives to improve models of mental healthcare with input into plans, collection of clinical data from existing patients and reviewing outcomes for efficacy.

    Full Job Description

    For the full job description of this role, please click here:  Clinical Psychologist Job Role

    Next Steps

    If you would like any further information or to register for our recruitment open day on 10th November, please complete the form below and we’ll be in touch.

      Consultant Psychiatrist

      Salary Expectations:

      £150,000 – £250,000 p.a. based on full time contract.  This includes a substantial bonus based on personal and business performance.

      Outline of Work Responsibilities 

      Cardinal Clinic receives around 20 new referrals each week across our adult and CAMHS services. We average around 15 in-patients per night. This caseload generates around 20,000 outpatient consultations each year. 

      Each patient is assigned a named consultant psychiatrist who is responsible for their care throughout their journey with Cardinal Clinic. The psychiatrist will be responsible for agreeing a care plan with the patient which may include referral to one of our team of therapists or clinical psychologists.  That care may be delivered in an out-patient setting, through the day care team or as an in-patient. 

      We expect all our psychiatrists to have responsibility for patients across all three services and to lead the care of that patient through the multi-disciplinary team. 

      Consultant Support

      Each consultant will have the support of a dedicated administrator who will liaise with patients and undertake such administrative tasks as are appropriate to ensure the highest possible standards of patient care.  

      Our consultant psychiatrists are supported by a junior doctor on the in-patient service.  The junior doctor will be responsible for daily ward rounds and for providing support to the nursing team. 

      Patient Contact Expectations

      We welcome applications for people seeking both full-time and part-time work patterns.

      We expect our consultant psychiatrists to work a variety of shift patterns including at least one shift each week that encompasses an evening surgery for out-patients.  We expect them to manage the following level of patient responsibility per programmed activity (four-hour period): 

      Out-Patient Consultations: 4 Consultations (one initial assessment, three follow-ups) 

      In-Patient Nights: 14 Nights 

      Day Care Sessions: 16 Sessions 

      Performance Management 

      We expect our consultant psychiatrists to provide care of an extremely high quality. We undertake regular performance reviews to ensure our standards are being maintained. These performance reviews are based on 360-degree feedback from our nursing team, from patient reviews received on our I Want Great Care platform, on compliance with our procedures and on outcome measurements of patient’s progress. 

      Other Responsibilities and Expectations

      • To maintain their own continuing professional development (CPD) obligations as outlined by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and to support colleagues with mentoring and training, as required.
      • To contribute to the operational and strategic management of Cardinal Clinic through the clinical governance and management frameworks.  These may include formal management positions, where appropriate.
      • To contribute to improving standards of clinical care through participation in clinical audit and quality improvement activities.
      • To participate in annual appraisal and job planning processes.
      • To participate in continuing medical education events and undertake statutory and mandatory training programmes.
      • To participate in initiatives to improve models of mental healthcare with input into plans, collection of clinical data from existing patients and reviewing outcomes for efficacy.
      • To be approved as a Responsible Clinician or be willing to undertake training to obtain Section 12(2) MHA and to renew this approval according to agreed procedures.

      Full Job Description

      For the full job description of this role, please click here: Consultant Psychiatrist Job Description 

      Next Steps

      If you would like any further information or to register for our recruitment open day on 10th November, please complete the form below and we’ll be in touch.

        Coronavirus (COVID-19)

        The NHS and Public Health Organisations are extremely well prepared for outbreaks of new infectious diseases. The NHS has put in place measures to ensure the safety of all patients and NHS staff while also ensuring services are available to the public as normal. Please check the Government Website for the latest information.

        Returning Travellers

        Stay indoor and avoid contact with other people immediately if you’ve travelled to the UK from:

        • Hubei province in China in the last 14 days, even if you do not have symptoms

        • Iran, lockdown areas in northern Italy or special care zones in South Korea since 19 February, even if you do not have symptoms

        • Other parts of mainland China or South Korea, Hong King, Japan, Macau, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan or Thailand in the last 14 days and have a cough, high temperature or shortness of breath (even if your symptoms are mild)

        • Other parts of northern Italy (anywhere north of Pisa, Florence and Rimini), Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar or Vietnam since 19 February and have a cough, high temperature or shortness of breath (even if your symptoms are mild)

        Do not go to a GP surgery, community pharmacy or hospital. Use the 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do next.

        Stress – Friend or Foe?

        Let’s start by looking at a few definitions of stress. Lazarus & Folkman (1984) define stress as ‘A particular relationship between the person and the environment that is appraised by the person as taxing or exceeding his or her resources and endangering his or her wellbeing’. Similarly, Selye (1956) defined stress as ‘Something that seriously affects one’s homeostasis’.

        In a nutshell stress is our perception that we won’t be able to cope with the challenge’s life is presently throwing at us; it bombards us with feelings of fear and anxiety, perhaps sometimes even anger.

        A stressor is something that is trying to disrupt our balance. They can present themselves as physiological threats, such as a car accident or a sports injury. They can also present in psychological form through our perceptions of danger. Let’s take University as an example. Say you have just received a fail for your recent exam paper, your brain may perceive this as a threat as it has the ability to catapult you into worry about what happens next.

        “How am I going to afford another year of studies if I fail?”

        “How am I going to tell my parents that I failed?”

        After asking ourselves these questions, we notice that our heart begins to beat a little faster than usual, our mouth becomes a little dry and our hands begin to sweat; we have activated our stress response.

        During the stress response a cascade of hormones are released that ignite physiological changes, some of which have already been mentioned. These hormones, alongside the activation of sympathetic nervous system prepare us to deal with the threat at hand.

        According to Robert Yerkes and John Dodson (1908) stress is good for you, up until a point. The psychologists hypothesised that little to no stress leaves us feeling bored and uninterested but too much stress leaves us feeling frazzled and drained. In between the two is the ‘sweet spot’ where we perform at our best. Furthering this, it is common among literature that chronic exposure to stress can have serious health consequences such as heart disease and obesity (McEwen & Sapolsky, 2006).

        So too much stress is bad for you, right? To an extent yes, but what if your belief about stress is the bigger factor in this misunderstood equation?

        Keller, Litzelman, Wisk et al (2012) tracked the deaths of Americans over an 8-year period. They identified that 182,000 died not from stress itself, but the belief that stress is bad for you. The researchers suggested that individuals who had the perception that stress has a negative effect on their health, accompanied by a large volume of self-reported stress had an increased risk of premature death.

        So, what if we began to view those physiological changes as our body becoming energised? Preparing us to tackle the challenge head on. By training ourselves to view the stress response as a positive, we can begin to feel more confident, less anxious and have a healthier heart (Jameson, Nock & Mendes, 2012).

        When you choose to view your own stress response as helpful, you create the biology of courage” Kelly McGonigal (2013).

        References

        Jamieson, J., Nock, M., & Mendes, W. (2012). Mind over matter: Reappraising arousal improves cardiovascular and cognitive responses to stress. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 141(3), 417-422. doi: 10.1037/a0025719

        Keller, A., Litzelman, K., Wisk, L., Maddox, T., Cheng, E., Creswell, P., & Witt, W. (2012). Does the perception that stress affects health matter? The association with health and mortality. Health Psychology, 31(5), 677-684. doi: 10.1037/a0026743

        Lazarus, R., & Folkman, S. (1986). Stress, appraisal, and coping. New York: Springer.

        McEwen, B., & Sapolsky, R. (2006). Stress and Your Health. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 91(2), 0-0. doi: 10.1210/jcem.91.2.9994

        McGonigal, K. (2013). How to make stress your friend [Video File). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RcGyVTAoXEU

        Schneiderman, N., Ironson, G., & Siegel, S. (2005). Stress and Health: Psychological, Behavioral, and Biological Determinants. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 1(1), 607-628. doi: 10.1146/annurev.clinpsy.1.102803.144141

        Selye, H. (1956). The Stress of Life. New York: McGraw Hill.

        Yerkes, R., & Dodson, J. (1908). The relation of strength of stimulus to rapidity of habit-formation. Journal of Comparative Neurology and Psychology, 18(5), 459-482. doi: 10.1002/cne.920180503

        Mental Health Awareness Week – Body Image

        Body image is about how we see ourselves when we look in the mirror or how we picture ourselves in our minds.

        Many people of all ages, genders and cultures struggle with their body image and may have a negative perception of their appearance. It is important to remember that there isn’t a single type of beauty and everyone sees it differently.

        People with a positive body image are more likely to have good physical and mental health. Girls and women with negative thoughts and feelings about their bodies are more likely to develop certain mental health conditions such as eating disorders and depression.

        A negative body image can also lead to low self-esteem. This can have a huge impact on lots of aspects of your life and may cause you to not want to be around your friends and you may start to obsess about what you eat or how much you exercise.

        What causes a negative body image?

        We are exposed to some much imagery about how we should look it’s difficult to ignore it. Children of parents who diet or have a negative body image of themselves are more likely to develop unhealthy thoughts about their own bodies.

        Sometimes, past events and circumstances can cause a negative body image, including:

        • Being teased or bullied as a child for how you looked
        • Being told you’re ugly, too fat or too thin or having any aspect of your appearance criticised
        • Seeing images or messages in the media, including social media, that make you feel bad about how you look
        • Being underweight, overweight or obese

        If you are struggling, remember:

        • Be kind to yourself and try not to compare yourself to all the images you see online and on social media. Many of those images have been retouched and digitally enhanced to make them appear to be ’perfect’. They are not a true representation of how people look in real life
        • Focus on the things you like about yourself
        • Try and spend time with people who make you feel positive about yourself. Some people find it beneficial to write down the compliments they receive and not just about the way they look. People value you for many reasons
        • Think about what you would say to a friend if they were struggling with how they look, what advice would you give?
        • Talk to someone you can trust and that you feel you can confide in

        If you feel you are unable to cope, it is advisable to make an appointment with your GP.

        Tips for a positive body image

        • Keep a list of things you like about yourself and remember to refer to it often
        • Remind yourself that beauty is not skin deep. Look at yourself as a whole person, beauty is a state of mind and not a state of body
        • Wear clothes that are comfortable and make you feel good about your body
        • Reduce the amount your accessing the media and social media. Be aware of images, slogans or attitudes that make you feel bad about yourself and remember these are images are likely to have been edited
        • Do something nice for yourself, this can be a bubble bath, meeting up with friends or whatever you find relaxing and enjoyable

        World Bipolar Day – Strength for today, hope for tomorrow

        The vision of World Bipolar Day is to bring world awareness to bipolar disorders and eliminate social stigma.

        World Bipolar Day (WBD) is an initiative of the Asian Network of Bipolar Disorder (ANBD) and the International Bipolar Foundation (IBPF) and the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD). It is celebrated each year on March 30th, the birthday of Vincent Van Gogh who was posthumously diagnosed as probably having bipolar disorder.

        What is Bipolar Disorder?

        Bipolar Disorder is a mental health condition that mainly affects your mood. People with Bipolar Disorder are likely to have times where they experience:

        • Manic or hypomanic episodes (feeling high)
        • Depressive episodes (feeling low)
        • Potentially some psychotic symptoms – during manic or depressed episodes

        The Facts (Bipolar UK)

        • Bipolar is a common condition. 1 to 2% of the population experience a lifetime prevalence of bipolar and recent research suggests as many as 5% of us are on the bipolar spectrum. 12
        • On average, it takes 10.5 years to receive a correct diagnosis of bipolar in the UK
        • Bipolar increases the risk of suicide x 20
        • The World Health Organisation identifies bipolar as one of the top causes of lost years of life and health in 15 to 44 year olds
        • Compared to other health problems, treatment of bipolar is still badly affected by misunderstanding and stigma
        • Bipolar affects every aspect of your life and your relationships. Family and friends can all be put under stress

        The Diagnosis

        The diagnosis is usually made by a psychiatrist who will:

        • Take a comprehensive history to arrive at a clear diagnosis
        • Assess risk e.g. safety to drive, or stay at home on your own or risk of suicide
        • Medication – stopping antidepressants and starting mood stabilisers
        • Psychoeducation of the patient and the family so they understand the illness and how best to manage it
        • Psychological therapy

        The Long Term

        The aim of the treatment is to stabilise the persons mood and effectively manage their symptoms. Ongoing support is likely to be provided by the Community Mental Health Team (CMHT) or the GP.

        Self-care is an important part of managing the condition and it is advisable for the person to:

        • Get to know their moods – monitor mood over a period, use a mood diary
        • Understand triggers – action can then be taken to minimise the impact
        • Recognise the warning signs – this could be a change in seeping and/or eating habits
        • Take practical steps – sticking to a routine – this includes taking medication at the same time and taking time for hobbies and social plans
        • Looking after physical health plays an important role too – eating a healthy diet, getting enough sleep and taking regular exercise

        World Bipolar Day

        Each of the funding organisations encourage their members to raise the profile of bipolar via social media, press, organising an educational event and tweet using @WorldBipolarDay More information is available at http://www.worldbipolarday.org/

        References 

        1Merikangas KR, Peters TL, Update on the Epidemiology of Bipolar Disorder. In Yatham LN, Maj M “Bipolar Disorder Clinical and Neurobiological Foundations”, Chapter 6, page 52-61. Wiley-Blackwell UK, 2010.

        2Lam, D.; Wright, K.; Smith, N. (2004). “Dysfunctional assumptions in bipolar disorder”. Journal of Affective Disorders 79.

        Mental Health and Elite Sport

        It’s encouraging to hear the many voices of elite athletes that have spoken out about mental health and sport. There have also been some tragic suicides.

        Sports people experience extreme pressure to score goals, run faster and win trophies all under the watchful eye of their fans and followers as well as the scrutiny from the media. All have an opinion (and are not afraid to express it) on how they can improve and the errors they have made in their last performance.

        Research

        Research from Mind identified three areas of mental health concern that coincides with times of key transition:

        1. Leaving

        What happens when an athlete must come to terms outside of sport? A young person may join a football academy at 16 years of age but how many of them are playing professional football at the age of 21? A bad performance can lead to being dropped and funding being withdrawn.

        For those who continue their career into adult hood, this usually brings a higher profile and added pressures and expectations.

        1. Retirement

        Facing retirement form sport is a particularly daunting time for most athletes. They have identified as athletes, and this is now being taken away from them.

        1. Struggling in Silence

        Many sports people have spoken out about their own struggles with mental health; including depression, self-harm and anxiety and they have actively encouraged others to do the same. The amount of people suffering in silence is unknown. It is understandable that those who are still playing and competing are reticent about speaking out. They are concerned what impact asking for help may have on their career; unfortunately demonstrating there is still a stigma attached to mental health.

        Mind’s research went on to explore 6 sports that showed sports clubs, governing bodies and player associations are starting to recognise that mental health is as important as physical health.

        The 6 sports they looked at are Football, Rugby League and Rugby Union, Cricket and individual sports – Athletics and Swimming.

        Key Learnings

        • There is no ‘one size fits all’ solution to address the mental health issues that exist in sport. All sports have different needs as they do not have same structure. The report recognised that there are already some great initiatives in place and best practices and learning outcomes should be shared.
        • There is a need to carry on and build on the mental health initiatives that have been started by individuals and player associations, in collaboration with clubs and across team sports.
        • More support needs to be given to athletes at key transition periods in their careers. E.g. entering professional sport, signing their first contract, dealing with long term injury and retirement.
        • Confidentiality and independence were recognised as highly important to athletes when providing mental health support. There is also underlying concern about how a mental health problem may impact on their career.

        As part of the sport strategy ‘Sporting Future’ government has been looking at how sport can improve its offer of mental health support to elite sports people. ‘Sporting Future’ not only recognised the impact sport has on physical and mental health but also highlighted the sacrifices athletes make in striving for success.